no churn strawberry creme fraiche ice cream by bottomfeeder

Roasted Strawberries Pop in This No-Churn Ice Cream

Firstly unlike many other no churn ice cream recipes this one is not sickly sweet. I aimed to reduce the sweetness of the mandatory no churn condensed milk part (I think the sugar and custardy texture help make it more foolproof than a more headache-inducing version with an egg based custard or similar wizardry).

strawberries roasting on an oven tray


ROASTED STRAWBERRIES?!
Roasting the strawberries gives you a great depth and big strawberry flavour while also reducing the sweetness and water content that can cause the dreaded ice crystals in ice cream. If you wish to try add fresh cut up strawberries in your ice cream mix, be warned! The water content of the fresh fruit might add icy bits! It’s best to add these on top when serving, but give it a go if you’re not fussed about icy ice cream.

TO SERVE
Serve a scoop or two simply with some fresh strawberries or extra creme fraiche on top in a cup or cone, or go ham and sandwich between wafers or cookies for a fancy homemade ice cream sandwich (I did ). Basil and mint are great herby additions, as are the strawberry leaves themselves (I find these taste earthy and slightly basil-like, but less fragrant – plus you already have them!).

RECIPE
ROASTED STRAWBERRY CREME FRAICHE ICE CREAM – NO CHURN


INGREDIENTS
500g strawberries, tops cut off (use them to make a strawb top vinegar)
1/2 tbsp white sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla bean paste (or extract)
197ml/g* sweetened condensed milk (1/2 a can – double the recipe you want to use it all)
200ml/g cream (full fat, must be whippable)
100ml/g creme fraiche (can substitute for sour cream)

METHOD
Roasted strawbs
1. Preheat oven to 160°C. Wash, lightly dry and halve your strawbs. Pop on an oven tray and toss with sugar, then spread into a single layer.
2. Roast for 40-45 mins. Don’t let the sugary juices burn!
3. Once roasted scrape everything into a food processor and blitz till as smooth as possible. Allow to cool.

ICE CREAM (WOO!)

  1. Chuck your condensed milk into the food processor with the cooled strawb mix. Blitz for 1-2 minutes till well combined and aerated.
  2. In a large bowl (larger than you need, we’ll dump the strawberry mix in here later instead of dirtying another bowl 😉) whip together cream, creme fraiche and vanilla till stiff peaks are achieved.
  3. Push the cream to one side of the bowl and pour the strawberry mix next to it, scraping everything out with a spatula.
  4. Fold a scoop of the cream mix through gently (don’t beat, we need the air to get the right texture!). When mostly mixed in add another scoop and repeat. This helps start to lighten the mix so it’s easier to fold through and allows you to retain the air you spent all time time whipping the creams into desserty submission.
  5. Now fold through the rest of the strawberry mix into the cream. Again gently folding till it’s almost a homogeneous millennial pink. About 15-20 folds should do it. A few streaks here and there make it look lovely, so don’t stress about them.

FREEZING + SERVING

  1. Pour your ice cream into a container – either an airtight glass one or a metal one (freezes quickly and retains the cold temp).
  2. Top with a sheet of baking paper cut to fit your container and smooth it out to prevent bubbles that can create dreaded icy bits. Freeze for 12 hours. You get more of a soft serve texture after at least 3-6 hours.
  3. Serving – let it sit at room temp for a few mins to make it easier to scoop. It might seem hard once frozen for a few days, but it’s more like a churned ice cream and scoops more easily when it softens a lil’. Not bad at all for homemade!

VARIATIONS
You could roast other fruit and substitute, but strawberries are pretty darn hard to beat! I also want to work on a version that incorporates the strawberry leaves into the ice cream the future…keep your eyes peeled!

NOTES:
* All ingredients can be interchangeably weighed on a scale or measured in a cup. I find it easier to just weigh creams in a bowl or straight into the food processor instead of dirtying a measuring cup and having the scrape it all out.

ZERO WASTE LEFTOVER USE IDEAS
– Strawberry tops – Strawberry top vinegar, use leaves as garnish.
– Cream – whip and serve alongside your ice cream.
– Creme fraiche – serve a dollop with your ice cream. Kind of like a cross between ricotta and double cream – really nice on toast with jam or leftover fresh strawberries.



Tag me on instagram at @_bottomfeeder if you end up making this! I’d love to know who it went and how you served it🙏🌞

This strawberry series of recipes was developed by me in response to the plight of strawberry farmers in Australia, many of whom have been forced to sell their spring strawbs below cost price due to the affects of Covid Lockdown around Australia. With heavily reduced business from bakeries, restaurants and cafes (that are still takeaway only at the time of writing) their berries are piling up, and some are spraying their crops and letting them die out of desperation. See more of my strawberry recipes here!

Filipino adobo pickled mushies


Restaurant quality mushrooms from @maximmushrooms

Everyone goes mushroom mad sometimes. This recipe is perfect for when you’ve bought or foraged a few too many of mother earth’s favourite umami cups. It features the usual pickling spices, plus the Filipino zap of coconut vin – a taste which pairs well with the meaty mushrooms and reminds my inner child of mum’s chicken adobo. Mmm. I used Phoenix Oyster Mushrooms sourced from a lovely small-scale grower @maximushrooms (DM Maxim via instagram to order), based out the backdoor of Sydney – but you could easily get ‘em (or other varieties like shimeji, king oyster, shiitake, saffron milk caps or pine) from a good grocer (especially Asian ones) or grow-at-home kit and it’d be lightyears better than the supermarket. Pro tip: Char the mushies before pickling for bonus smokiness.

(A brief aside on coconut vinegar before we commence – Coconut vinegar doesn’t taste particularly coconutty. I used the type made by fermenting coconut water (suka ng niyog). Generally, the brown-tinged variety is made from coconut sap (sukang tuba).)

No more ado – here’s my recipe for Filipino Adobo Pickled Mushrooms:

INGREDIENTS
Oyster mushrooms
Coconut vinegar (Filipino brand preferred, like Datu Putti)
Bay leaves
Whole black peppercorns
Small garlic clove, thinly sliced
Non-iodised salt, a pinch

METHOD

  1. Sterilise your jars and lids by placing them on a tray in a cold oven, set to 100ºC (212°F).
  2. Clean your mushrooms – by gently pulling them apart (if joined to a big mushroomy mass), and tearing larger ones in half. Wash them lightly (no gritty gills here), and allow to dry in the sun.
  3. Sear mushrooms – Heat an aluminium or cast iron pan on medium high heat and dry-sear the mushrooms till lightly charred (ie. no oil for max char). Don’t overcrowd the pan, otherwise they’ll stew, so doing this in batches is best. Press down the mushrooms with another pan to get an even sear. Flip and do this for all mushrooms on both sides. Set aside mushrooms. Don’t wash your pan! Add some water and boil on medium while scraping all the smoky char add this water to the water portion of the next step.
  4. Make your pickling brine – Make enough pickling brine to fill your jars. Simmer equal amounts of coconut vinegar and water(add your smoky mushroom pan liquid here) in a small pot.
  5. Take your jars out of the oven with tongs.
  6. Assemble – Add 1-2 bay leaves, 4-6 black peppercorns and 2-3 THIN slices of garlic (these pack a punch) per 200ml jar (scale this up or down depending on the bigness of your jars and your flavour preferences). Add your seared mushrooms to the sterilised jars. Pour over the hot hot brine, leaving 1cm headroom. Run a knife around the inside edge of the jar to release air pockets. Tap the jar a few times and repeat. Add more brine if required and pop a lid on.
  7. Storing – Store in a cool, dark place out of sunlight for at least 2-3 weeks to let the flavours develop. Should keep for a minimum of 1 year. Refrigerate after opening.

This recipe is featured as part of a fermentation community celebration for Sandor Katz’ new book ‘Fermentation Journey’s (published by Chelsea Green). This screened as part of a livestream on October 10. Register here to access the videos that were shown, hosted and curated by Cultures Group. You can see me demo this recipe step by step!
Thank you to chef Ken Fornataro from Cultures group for bringing together the fermentation community! It’s a joy to share and document our recipes, pickles and ferments in honour of Sandor’s own journey and learnings alongside many that I admire and learn from myself.

Summery Sweet! Mango Pits & Peels Make a Delicious Marinade

There’s nothing like biting into some juicy mango on a hot summer’s day. I have so many memories of cross hatching mango cheeks with a knife and inverting them to become an edible cubist echidna. But what do you do with the pits and the peels that you can’t eat? I recently came across this recipe from Cornersmith (also in the Use It All cookbook) and lowered the amount of sugar since I’d mainly use it as a more savoury marinade. Make your mango scraps go the extra mile! It’s surprising how little mango you need to get a good flavour. This marinade base tastes kind of like a subtle Weis bar with a light gingery kick – you can add other ingredients to tweak it to your taste, see the recipe below for suggestions.


RECIPE
MANGO SCRAP MARINADE BASE

INGREDIENTS:
2-3 mangoes
2 tbsp sugar (or honey)
2 cups water
A few slices of ginger (or 2 tbsp dried ginger pieces/skin)

METHOD
1. Prepare your mangoes – we need the pits and skins for this recipe. Cut off the cheeks and seperate the flesh from the skin with a large spoon. Peel the section around the pit and cut off any mango you want to utilise – reserve the mango flesh for another use.

2. Add the mango peels and pits, sugar, water and ginger to a small pot on medium heat. Stir to dissolve the sugar and bring to a simmer.

3. Simmer for 10 mins, then turn the heat off. Let the flavours infuse for 15 mins.

4. Strain the mango marinade through a sieve pressing as much mango as you can out. Pop the mixture back on the heat on low to reduce further if you’d like it thicker.

5. To use as a meat marinade, use as is, or add salt or fish sauce, pepper, olive oil, and/or chilli to your taste. It also goes great in salad dressing or as is on sweet things like ice cream and pancakes.

MANGO MARINADE VARIANT SUGGESTIONS
Add these to the marinade base for something different
– Asian: fish/soy sauce, lime juice and zest, coriander stems and/or a bashed lemongrass stalk.
– Mango sweet chilli: chilli or sriracha and maybe a little honey.
– Mango BBQ: garlic, bbq sauce, chilli.

What would you use this mango marinade for?

Use Your (Prawn) Head! Zero-Waste Prawn Head Oil

Merry belated Christmas! I hope, like me and my family, you enjoyed bucketloads of fresh seafood and prawns or maybe you’re having some for New Years. With all those prawns, inevitably comes lots of leftover prawn heads, tails and shells. In this recipe I’m going to show you how to get the most bang for your buck from your prawns by extracting that rich flavour of the sea into a deep red hued prawn oil. Best of all you only need 4 ingredients. Freeze your prawn bits till you have 1kg or so and simply thaw out in the fridge and drain. Inspired by Christmas, but great anytime you have prawns.

This prawn oil is great tossed through pasta or noodles – use it to flavour a stir fry, curry or cook fried rice or vegetables with it. Drizzle it on soups or seafood dishes for an extra oomph of umami prawny flavour.

My partner Mark and I filmed this recipe as a video. We’re going to try do this for our recipes from now on!


RECIPE
ZERO-WASTE PRAWN HEAD OIL

INGREDIENTS
1 small brown onion, finely diced (keep the skin and ends)
Vegetable oil or other neutral-flavoured oil
1-2kg Prawn heads, shells and tails
1/4 teaspoon salt
Optional: Onion skin peels and ends 

METHOD
1. Prepare the prawn heads by tearing up the shells from the head flesh you can also bash them with a mortar and pestle. Make sure there’s no poop chutes (otherwise known as the prawn poo veins)!

2. Heat a deep pot on medium heat. Add a splash of oil, then toss in your diced onion and salt. Cook for approx 5 min, stirring occasionally until softened and translucent.

3. Increase the heat to medium high. Add the prawn heads, onion skin and ends and cover them half way in vegetable oil. 

4. Cook them for approximately 30-45min, until the oil is reddy/orange in colour. Stir and crush the heads/shells with a wooden spoon periodically to release flavour.

5. Strain into jars. Allow to cool and store in the fridge. It lasts for a couple of months (if you haven’t finished it before then!).

OTHER PRAWN HEAD & SHELL USES
– Prawn stock – You could also simmer prawn heads and shells with water to make a flavourful stock. Great as a base for seafood dishes, pasta sauce, tom yum soup, ramen, risotto and as a general flavour enhancer in stir fries, veggies, curries and noodle dishes. 
– Crunchy prawn heads – Season self raising flour with salt and coat the cleaned prawn heads. Deep fry for a few minutes till crisp and golden right through. Eat with a chilli sambal or sweet chilli sauce to dip.

What are your favourite uses for prawn shells and heads?

Long live Condimental! Quirky, long-life pickles, preserves & sauces curated seasonally

#NOTANAD: Condimental have been on my radar for a while now – a local Sydney-based business putting out limited edition, seasonally curated boxes of elevated condiments (they also produce their own label items). Definitely a ‘first aid kit for boring food’ as you’ll see from some of my recipes below. From vinegars, hot sauce, miso and pickles to chutneys (ones you’ll actually use, not like the shit re-gifted xmas type) and fancy finishing salts – there’s a box for everyone (they also sell single products if you just want to dip your toe in). As the runs are quite small batch, some of the really good gems are only available in the seasonal boxes!

I couldn’t stop thinking about their ‘Summer Box‘ in particular. It’s the perfect mix of special and more everyday (only in use, not in quality!) items in my opinion. The Summer Box (the fourth curated box so far) includes these condiments: a red wine ‘field blend’ vinegar from Chef Hugh Piper at Dear Saint Eloise in Potts Point, Two Good Co head Chef Megan’s eggplant kasundi (a nice eggplant chutney of sorts packed with an Indian-style spice blend and flavour), pineapple chilli chutney by Condimental themselves (this one is a banger!), red gum smoked salt from Olsson’s in the cutest ceramic thingy with a lil wooden spoon (the smoky flavour is unreal), myrtled fennel pickle – another own brand creation from Condimental. I love Cornersmith’s pickled fennel, so I figured I’d be into a version with a lil’ sumthin’ sumthin’ extra.

How the hell did I use these new found flavour-bombs? I had some sloppy (but really tasty, tasty) toasties and rice bowls in the privacy of my own home…but I took photos of my greatest hits to share here. Keep scrolling to see what was in the box, and how I used it.

How good is this packaging

PINEAPPLE AND CHILLI CHUTNEY – CONDIMENTAL
My fave condiment in the whole box so far

Ham, cheese and pineapple toastie with pineapple chilli chutney (crispy ham rind garnish)
Ploughman’s plate with pineapple chilli chutney (top left)
Close up of the pineapple chilli chutney with ham

RED GUM SMOKED SALT – OLSSON’S
Versatile for sweet and savoury use and deeply smoky.

Fig, nectarine, goat’s cheese and basil salad dressed w/ evoo olive oil, balsamic vinegar and Olsson’s red gum smoked salt
Kale stem pesto toast with a fried egg and a sprinkle of Olsson’s smoked salt

☝️See my recipe for kale stem pesto here

Country style ham hock beans (using xmas ham bone meat leftovers) finished with smoky red gum salt to enhance the ham
Smoked trout on toast sprinkled smoky salt and served with a chunky tabouli (lemon juice and evoo on the side to sprinkle on top)

MEGAN’S EGGPLANT KASUNDI – Two Good Co

A rice and veg bowl with an egg. Eggplant kasundi added for a flavour punch!
Leftover lamb, roasted sweet potato and eggplant kasundi sandwich

The products remind me of produce you’d get at a fancy grocer or farmer’s market, if you do the math (I did, haha) it’s often not as pricey.

There’s always a nice mix of condiments. The best part being that most of them are long life items, so you can take your sweet time getting through them (not that I’ve had much success with that…I only have 3/5 items left and one is a smoky salt I’m using sparingly).

I’m saving the pickled fennel for good ideas and have a lot of red wine vinegar to use before I open this special one. I will update this post with the ideas I have for using both those eventually, I promise!

Each seasonal box comes with a card like this to inspire and explain

Here’s the Condimental Summer Box in all its glory. If you want your own, be quick, as there’s only 16 left at the time of writing. Shop now.

Cauliflower stem and leaf pizza with egg

Cauliflower leaves make an excellent pizza topping

Cauliflower leaves are quickly becoming my go-to zero-waste staple. This non-traditional pizza recipe came about when I ran out of baby spinach but was craving a spinach and egg pizza. The closest thing I had in the crisper was a whole cauliflower + extra cauliflower leaves (everyone left them behind at the grocers, so I sneakily grabbed a handful and put it with my cauliflower bag hehe). I thought…I COULD USE CAULIFLOWER LEAVES!

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I was going to use tomato paste on the base but decided to use kale stem pesto because I had some fresh. I usually make a big batch and keep some in the fridge, then freeze the rest in sheets so I can break off the amount I need. You can also just use readymade, but if you want to give it a go here’s my recipe for kale stem pesto.

Kale stem oesto spread on a pizza base

It’s pretty easy. Seperate the leaves and stems, cut the stems into small pieces and baked quickly to soften a bit, then pop it on a pizza base spread with kale stem pesto (my recipe here, you can also use store bought). Add a few other bits and pieces, pop it back in the oven, add your egg towards the end and there you have it! YOUR OWN. PERSONAL. PIZZA.

All the ingredients below can be subbed for whatever you have available…I just used what I had for this very last minute pizza. For the cheese go ahead an use something fancier like mozzarella or bocconcini (it’ll be better, obviously, but sometimes you just need to offload a few slices of cheese) or scale it back to the tasty cheese slices…nobody will know, not even Instagram. If you don’t have pistachios, almonds or hazelnuts would work just as well. The pizza base I tried happened to also contain cauliflower (Picasso kitchen cauliflower base – a regular base with cauliflower added to up the veg content). It wasn’t bad! I’d buy it again for quick meals like this. It was thin and became nice and crispy. I’d usually have less toppings but my slight distrust of the pizza base and hunger meant I piled it on a bit more.

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RECIPE

EASY CAULIFLOWER LEAF & EGG PIZZA

INGREDIENTS
Cauliflower leaves, 4 large pieces, stems attached
Pre-made pizza base
2 tbsp kale stem pesto (or pre-made pesto alternative)
10-12 kalamata olives, drained
1 tsp capers (optional – can just use a pinch of salt instead)
2 slices gouda cheese, torn into pieces (or whatever cheese you have)
100g pistachios, shelled and chopped
1 large egg
Salt and pepper, to taste

METHOD
1. Pre-heat a fan forced oven to 180°C. Rinse and trim the cauliflower leaves. Pat dry. Line a large oven tray with baking paper and set aside.

2. Pull leaves off cauliflower stems, keeping leaves and stems seperate. Tear the leaves into bite sized pieces. Chop stems into 1cm pieces, halving any large ones, then pop onto your lined baking tray with a drizzle of olive oil and 1 tsp of capers and pepper. Toss to coat in oil, place tray in oven for 2 minutes or till stems are beginning to soften slightly (this pre-cooking ensures they’re not undercooked at the end).

3. Spread pesto evenly onto your chosen pizza base using a spoon leaving a bit of a border for the crust edge. Scatter the cauliflower stems and capers, cauliflower leaves and pistachios on top making sure to leave an egg-sized bare circle on the middle of the base for the egg later on (one or two leaves on the circle are ok you just don’t want a mound of things there messing with the egg and popping the yolk). Top with cauliflower leaves and put back in the oven following the packet directions for the pizza base (my thin one required 8 minutes). Halfway through add your cheese on top (still avoiding the middle bare bit).

cheese

4. Meanwhile crack your egg into a ramekin so it’s easier to place it. Take out your pizza and drizzle with a little olive oil (the cauliflower leaves should be crispy, this addition of oil just ensures they don’t burn).
Carefully slide the egg out of the ramekin into the middle ensuring the yolk doesn’t break (no biggie if it does, it’ll just cook quicker). Use a spoon to spread out the egg white slightly to fill any gaps between it and the fillings. Place the olives anywhere the egg isn’t and put back into the oven for 2-3 minutes or until your pizza crust is golden and the egg is just starting to turn white on the edges (without clear bits).

rawegg

5. To serve sprinkle with some chopped pistachios, fresh basil leaves and pepper (there’s probably enough salt with the capers and olives). Season the egg with salt and pepper. Cut into 4 slices, ensuring all bits get a bit of egg/yolk and enjoy!

I’d love to hear your spin on this pizza! What did you add?

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MORE OF MY CAULIFLOWER LEAF RECIPES:
Easy Cauliflower Stem Breakfast Salad

WHAT ABOUT KALE STEMS, YOU SAY?
Save your stems! Easy raw kale pesto

Zero Waste veggie peel fritters

How often do you peel a carrot or a potato and chuck away the skin? Imagine if these nutritious strips could be turned into a whole ‘nother meal.

Well dream no more.

Recently I was cooking a bunch of carrots and parsnips, and didn’t have the heart to bin the peels — so I developed this frugal fritter recipe to make the most of them. It actually transforms them into caramelised discs of savoury goodness, with a subtle earthiness. You’ll never bin a peel again.

fritters1

RECIPE

ZERO WASTE VEGGIE PEEL FRITTERS

Serves 2 with leftovers. Cooking time: 30 mins

INGREDIENTS

  • 2.5 cups parsnip and carrot peels*, chopped finely (peels of approx 5 carrots and 4 small parsnips)**
  • Half a brown onion, finely diced
  • 1/4 cup self raising flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tsp ground tumeric
  • ½ tsp ground cumin
  • ½ tsp whole fennel Seeds
  • ¼ tsp ground nutmeg
  • Salt and pepper (to taste)
  • For serving: Greek yoghurt, salsa or chutney

METHOD

  1. In a biggish bowl mix together the eggs, onion, parsnip and carrot peels and any other veg. Add the flour, turmeric, cumin, nutmeg, salt and pepper and mix well.

  2. Heat a little vegetable oil in a non-stick fry pan on medium heat. Add heaped tablespoonfuls of the fritter mix in the pan pressing it flat into 1cm thick fritters before the mixture sets. Cook in batches for 2-3 mins per side or till golden.
  3. Transfer to a paper-towel-lined plate and keep warm. Serve fritters with salad and greek yoghurt, salsa or chutney.

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COOKING NOTES

* You can swap in and out any of the following veggie peels with this recipe: potato, sweet potato, beetroot and zucchini (if you weirdly were peeling zucchini for some reason, though it might make the mix watery so add flour to counteract).

** If you’re peeling veg but don’t feel like fritters, the peels will store well in a ziplock if used within a few days.

Supercharged Instant Ramen (feat. old mushrooms)

So late one night, my partner and I were watching a Bon Appetit video – the one where Claire painstakingly recreates a gourmet version of instant ramen – and suddenly we felt super-inspired to pimp up some packet ramen for ourselves.

We found some ageing mushrooms holding on for dear life at the bottom of the fridge. Usually I’d just throw them in with something meaty to add flavour, but I figured adding them to ramen would be a far more interesting way to use them up and extract their umami goodness.

But for any good ramen you need a good broth — and given its vital role, it’s preferable to use a homemade stock. It’s nicer than the salty store-bought versions — but in a pinch you could easily use a good quality liquid stock (with added pan-fried mushrooms), or even a stock cube or flavour packet if you really cbf.

Luckily, in the freezer, we rediscovered some frozen homemade chicken & miso mushroom stock that we decided would be an easy and tasty base. I won’t go into the detail now (of how this stock was made), but the short of it is, I’d made a regular chicken stock a few months ago, and just for the heck of it added some rich umami juice obtained from roasting huge miso-covered mushrooms. If you’re interested in the full recipe, please comment below!

From there, we got way too enthused — the resulting ramen was so light and satisfying, and although it wasn’t a thick, 24-hour tonkatsu broth, it was super flavourful for the amount of time we put into it. Enjoy!

IMG_20181202_085156_body.jpgRECIPE

SUPERCHARGED INSTANT RAMEN

Makes 2 servings. Cooking time 15-20 minutes.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 litre of chicken and miso mushroom stock (or good quality liquid chicken stock)
  • 2 bricks of instant ramen
  • 300g almost-bad mushrooms, halved and sliced thinly*
  • 2cm piece of ginger, sliced
  • Few pinches roasted ground Szechuan pepper (or white pepper)
  • 2 tsp neutral flavoured oil (like rice bran, vegetable or grapeseed)
  • Sesame oil (to serve)
  • 1/3 cup dried seaweed (miyeok or wakame)
  • 2 tbsp dried diced porcini mushrooms
  • 3 eggs

METHOD

  1. Put 3 eggs into a small pot and cover with cold water on medium heat. Once boiling turn heat down to medium-low and start a 5 minute timer for slightly set (not runny) soft boiled eggs. Once done run under cold water till eggs are completely cool to stop them cooking.**
  2. In seperate small bowls, rehydrate dried porcini mushrooms and seaweed with boiling water. Reserve the liquid from both to add more umami flavour to your stock in Step 4.
  3. Heat a medium fry pan on medium heat and add 2 tsp neutral flavoured oil. Throw in sliced mushrooms with salt and ground Szechuan pepper to taste. Stir occasionally for 5 minutes or till roasty and slightly golden. Take off the heat and reserve.
  4. Meanwhile in a medium saucepan, bring your frozen stock to the boil – adding in the sliced ginger plus the reserved liquid from both the rehydrated seaweed and porcini mushrooms. Taste your stock – if it needs more flavour add soy sauce to taste, but keep in mind when soup’s too salty you get sick of a whole bowl. Break both bricks of ramen in half (they’re probably too wide for a small pot) and drop into the pot to cook ensuring they’re submerged in the stock. Stir to ensure even cooking. Allow to boil for 3-5 minutes or till ramen has reached your desired doneness. ***
  5. Peel eggshells off the eggs and cut each into halves. To serve tong the noodles into 2 deep bowls and pour over the soup. On top of the noodles in each bowl place half the seaweed, mushrooms and 3 egg halves. Sprinkle with a dash of sesame oil to taste.

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COOKING NOTES

* If your mushrooms are slightly dried out and look a bit worse for wear we can work with that – new ones are totally fine too but I just had sad ones!

** To level up your eggs: make soy sauce eggs (shoyu tamago) the day before. This Momofuku recipe sounds great!

*** I took the ramen off when it was al dente, with a bit of bite. This is okay as they’ll sit in the stock for a few minutes while you prepare everything else, so they’ll cook further without going too soft.

Filipino With Puff: Adobo Pie and Banana Catsup

Growing up, my Filipino mum would whip big batches of chicken adobo for dinner each week. This classic mix of chicken, soy sauce, vinegar and garlic makes for a punchy flavour that hits the spot between sweet, sour and salty. 100% comfort food.

This recipe puts a new spin on that classic Filipino taste, by encasing it in a classic Aussie crust. This dish is kinda like me! A mix of my Filipino and European heritage, with banana catsup – the Filipino version of ketchup – a tropical innovation that stemmed from a WWII tomato shortage, and pairs surprisingly well with the pie.

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RECIPE

CHICKEN ADOBO PIE WITH HOMEMADE BANANA CATSUP

Makes 4-6 pies. Cooking time 1.5hrs

INGREDIENTS

Chicken adobo

  • 1.5kg bone-in, skin-on chicken pieces (thighs or whole chicken cut into 8)
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1 cup apple cider vinegar (can also use white Filipino cane vinegar or white vinegar)
  • ½-1 cup water
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 10 large cloves of garlic, crushed
  • 2 tablespoons black peppercorns
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 2 bay leaves

Pie pastry

  • 2 sheets frozen puff pastry, thawed
  • 2 sheets frozen shortcrust pastry, thawed
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1 tablespoon butter

Banana catsup (banana ketchup)

  • 2 very ripe bananas, mashed till smooth (approx. 1 cup)
  • 1/4 cup eschallots, finely diced (or brown onion)
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 60ml white vinegar
  • 60ml water
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon palm or brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon, ginger finely grated
  • 1 tablespoon fresh turmeric, finely grated (1 teaspoon if using ground turmeric)
  • ¼ teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1/2 tablespoon tomato paste

METHOD

  1. To make the chicken adobo filling place the water, soy sauce, apple cider vinegar, sugar, cinnamon stick, peppercorns and bay leaves in a large pot. Place the chicken skin side down in the pan. If the chicken it isn’t covered in liquid add ½ to 1 cup water.
  2. Bring liquid to the boil on medium high heat, then turn down to medium low and simmer with the lid on for about 1 hour (or till chicken is cooked and juices run clear). Stir and turn the chicken every once in a while.
  3. While the chicken is cooking prepare the banana catsup. Heat the vegetable oil in a medium pot and cook the eschallots till translucent, then add the ginger, garlic, turmeric and all spice. Cook till the spices are fragrant.
  4. Add the tomato paste and cook for a minute, stirring well. Follow with vinegar, soy sauce, sugar and mashed banana. Simmer on low heat for 10-15 minutes, stirring often till it starts to thicken.
  5. If the banana ketchup is too thick add a bit of water to reach desired consistency. To store allow sauce to cool and transfer to an airtight container. Refrigerate for up to 2 weeks+.
  6. Once chicken adobo is cooked take it off the heat and allow to cool, however if the sauce is too runny remove the chicken and allow sauce to thicken on medium high heat. Next pull the meat off the bones and into bite sized pieces. Toss it with the thickened adobo sauce ready to go into the pies.
  7. Preheat oven to 220C and place a baking tray into the oven. Grease your pie pans of choice with butter (I used a medium 6 cup muffin tin). For the pie bases cut 6 x 15cm circles from the shortcrust pastry to line the base and sides of your pie tins. Brush the top edges with water. Fill with cooled chicken adobo mix. For the pie lids cut 6 x 15cm circles from the puff pastry. Place over meat and press to seal with a fork. Trim the edges to neaten and brush the tops with egg.
  8. Place pies onto a hot tray and bake for 20-25 minutes or until golden. Serve with the banana catsup.

It’s a long one, but I swear it’s worth it! Deliciously crispy pastry, filled with salty-sweet fall-apart chicken, finished with a fresh tang from the banana catsup… As an extra tip for your effort: Make a double batch of the chicken adobo and freeze half of it for more pies later or to chow down with rice. You’ll thank yourself later!

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Save Your Stems! Easy Raw Kale Pesto

I bought two massive bunches of kale on special, thinking I’d use it all quick smart. I was wrong. After a huge batch of kale salad and a tray of kale chips, there was still a big bunch in the fridge plus all the stems I’d kept (don’t judge me).

I thought I could make it into a pesto, and saw that some people blanched the stems first – but to be honest I tested it blanched versus raw and they both taste amazing, so save yourself the effort.

With that, here’s my recipe for a raw kale pesto that uses up every last scrap of kale and is prime to slather on pretty much anything.

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RECIPE
Raw Kale Stem Pesto

Yield: Approx. 1 ½ cups of finished pesto (1 x 300ml mason jar full)

INGREDIENTS
1 packed cup kale leaves, rinsed and roughly chopped
1 ½ packed cup kale stems, rinsed and roughly chopped
1 shallot, roughly chopped
2 garlic cloves – peeled
25ml lemon juice (approx. ½ a medium lemon)
Zest of ½ a medium lemon
¼ cup Parmesan cheese, grated
2 tbsp pine nuts or roasted walnuts
80ml olive oil
Salt and pepper, to taste

You could also add any herbs you have on hand like parsley or basil.

METHOD

  1. Add all the ingredients to a food processor, and pulse in controlled bursts till crumbly-looking without any big chunks. Scrape down the sides regularly to ensure everything’s processed relatively evenly.
  2. Add more lemon, salt or pepper to taste. And add a little more olive oil if you want a thinner pesto.
  3. To store, keep refrigerated in a hipster-looking glass jar for added effect, and top with olive oil to stop it browning. Freeze batches for later use in small containers or plastic freezer bags.

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Easy, right? Mix this pesto into pasta, soups, salads, spread it on toast or sandwiches for a herby garlicy, use it as a pizza sauce, toss veggies through it, top eggs with it, eat it with a steak or mix through meatballs. There’s so many ways to use it!