This Filipino ‘Tomato Ketchup’ is Actually Made From Bananas! 🍌

Yes, it’s bananas! This is the homemade Filipino version of bottled ‘ketchup’, except ours is made from bananas, not tomatoes. This tropical innovation stemmed from a WW2 tomato shortage and is my favourite way to use up overripe bananas and waaaay more versatile than banana bread!

My homemade banana ‘ketchup’ served on a traditional Filipino longsilog plate. The pickle next to it is atchara. Quality gourmet longganisa from Tata Rods.
Sautéing the base aromatics: eschallots, garlic, ginger and tumeric.

I originally tried this recipe served with chicken adobo pies years ago to use leftover adobo. It pairs well with anything you’d use tomato sauce on, and is traditionally eaten with lumpia shanghai (Filipino spring rolls) or tortang talong (whole eggplant omelette). I like it as a snack to dip chicharon (fried pork rinds) in, as the tangy sweetness cuts through the richness.

Pat Nourse & Helen Goh in conversation via Instagram Live for #MFWFOnline

During Ottolenghi Chef Helen Goh’s Melbourne Food and Wine Festival 2020: Online edition chat with Pat Nourse she waxed lyrical about her newfound love of Filipino cuisine. All the Filipino viewers cheered together loudly from home! She noted tortang talong as one of her absolute favourites and slipped in mention of homemade banana catsup being at the top of her ‘to cook’ list. Pat Nourse actually ended up sharing this very recipe in his instagram stories! Next day he got a special delivery from chef John Rivera! See below for Pat’s post and a beautiful show of the Filipino community spirit in Australia.

More modern serving suggestion banana ‘ketchup’ and adobo pies
Put this sauce it anywhere you’d use tomato sauce…like a bacon and egg english muffin!

For best results, use almost-black bananas that you’d usually reserve for banana bread using less ripe ones will cause your sauce to jellify at room temperature. It will still be delicious, but not quite the right texture.


RECIPE

HOMEMADE BANANA CATSUP (BANANA ‘KETCHUP’)

  • 2 very ripe bananas (almost black), mashed till smooth (approx. 1 cup)
  • 2 medium eschallots, finely diced (or 1/2 a small brown onion)
  • 1-2 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 60ml cane/white vinegar
  • 60ml water
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon palm or brown sugar
  • 4 garlic cloves, finely grated (approx 1 tablespoon)
  • 3cm ginger, finely grated (approx 1 tablespoon)
  • 3cm turmeric, finely grated (approx 1 tablespoon fresh, 1 teaspoon if using ground turmeric)
  • ¼ teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1/2 tablespoon tomato paste
  • optional 1 birdseye chilli, finely sliced (1/4 tsp chilli flakes)

METHOD 

1. Heat oil in a medium non-stick pan on medium heat. Cook the eschallots until translucent. 

2. Add the ginger, garlic, turmeric and all spice to the pan. Cook till spices are fragrant. 

3. Add the tomato paste and cook for a minute, stirring well. Follow with vinegar, soy sauce, sugar, chilli and mashed banana. Simmer on low heat for 10-15 minutes, stirring often until it starts to thicken. 

4. Add 60ml of water or more as needed to reach desired consistency. It’s usually best between thick and runny, but it will thicken a bit as it cools. Taste and add extra seasoning to your liking. Take off the heat. Blend with a stick blender to get a smoother texture.

To store, allow sauce to cool and transfer to airtight sterilised jars or containers. Refrigerate for up to 2 weeks. It can be kept longer, but use your own judgement.

Serving suggestions:
Traditional Filipino dishes Tortang talong (eggplant omelette) lumpia shanghai (Filipino spring rolls) any breakfast silogs (rice+meat, I did longsilog further up).
More modern applications As I said…anywhere you’d use tomato sauce! I’ve enjoyed it with steak, roasted veg, on a bacon and egg roll, with marinated tofu and rice…it’s all good! 👌

SAHOG @ Home photo of me with my produce and Filipino Food Movement tee before the Instagram livestream!


This Filipino condiment was presented by me at SAHOG @ Home with Filipino Food Movement – an Instagram Live series by @filipinofoodmovementau featuring their most loved Australian Filipino chefs, cooks and food lovers. Don’t miss the next one! I also prepared burong mangga (pickled green mango) and atchara (pickled green papaya relish). I’ll post my other recipes here with more serving suggestions soon!

Long live Condimental! Quirky, long-life pickles, preserves & sauces curated seasonally

#NOTANAD: Condimental have been on my radar for a while now – a local Sydney-based business putting out limited edition, seasonally curated boxes of elevated condiments (they also produce their own label items). Definitely a ‘first aid kit for boring food’ as you’ll see from some of my recipes below. From vinegars, hot sauce, miso and pickles to chutneys (ones you’ll actually use, not like the shit re-gifted xmas type) and fancy finishing salts – there’s a box for everyone (they also sell single products if you just want to dip your toe in). As the runs are quite small batch, some of the really good gems are only available in the seasonal boxes!

I couldn’t stop thinking about their ‘Summer Box‘ in particular. It’s the perfect mix of special and more everyday (only in use, not in quality!) items in my opinion. The Summer Box (the fourth curated box so far) includes these condiments: a red wine ‘field blend’ vinegar from Chef Hugh Piper at Dear Saint Eloise in Potts Point, Two Good Co head Chef Megan’s eggplant kasundi (a nice eggplant chutney of sorts packed with an Indian-style spice blend and flavour), pineapple chilli chutney by Condimental themselves (this one is a banger!), red gum smoked salt from Olsson’s in the cutest ceramic thingy with a lil wooden spoon (the smoky flavour is unreal), myrtled fennel pickle – another own brand creation from Condimental. I love Cornersmith’s pickled fennel, so I figured I’d be into a version with a lil’ sumthin’ sumthin’ extra.

How the hell did I use these new found flavour-bombs? I had some sloppy (but really tasty, tasty) toasties and rice bowls in the privacy of my own home…but I took photos of my greatest hits to share here. Keep scrolling to see what was in the box, and how I used it.

How good is this packaging

PINEAPPLE AND CHILLI CHUTNEY – CONDIMENTAL
My fave condiment in the whole box so far

Ham, cheese and pineapple toastie with pineapple chilli chutney (crispy ham rind garnish)
Ploughman’s plate with pineapple chilli chutney (top left)
Close up of the pineapple chilli chutney with ham

RED GUM SMOKED SALT – OLSSON’S
Versatile for sweet and savoury use and deeply smoky.

Fig, nectarine, goat’s cheese and basil salad dressed w/ evoo olive oil, balsamic vinegar and Olsson’s red gum smoked salt
Kale stem pesto toast with a fried egg and a sprinkle of Olsson’s smoked salt

☝️See my recipe for kale stem pesto here

Country style ham hock beans (using xmas ham bone meat leftovers) finished with smoky red gum salt to enhance the ham
Smoked trout on toast sprinkled smoky salt and served with a chunky tabouli (lemon juice and evoo on the side to sprinkle on top)

MEGAN’S EGGPLANT KASUNDI – Two Good Co

A rice and veg bowl with an egg. Eggplant kasundi added for a flavour punch!
Leftover lamb, roasted sweet potato and eggplant kasundi sandwich

The products remind me of produce you’d get at a fancy grocer or farmer’s market, if you do the math (I did, haha) it’s often not as pricey.

There’s always a nice mix of condiments. The best part being that most of them are long life items, so you can take your sweet time getting through them (not that I’ve had much success with that…I only have 3/5 items left and one is a smoky salt I’m using sparingly).

I’m saving the pickled fennel for good ideas and have a lot of red wine vinegar to use before I open this special one. I will update this post with the ideas I have for using both those eventually, I promise!

Each seasonal box comes with a card like this to inspire and explain

Here’s the Condimental Summer Box in all its glory. If you want your own, be quick, as there’s only 16 left at the time of writing. Shop now.