This Filipino ‘Tomato Ketchup’ is Actually Made From Bananas! 🍌

Yes, it’s bananas! This is the homemade Filipino version of bottled ‘ketchup’, except ours is made from bananas, not tomatoes. This tropical innovation stemmed from a WW2 tomato shortage and is my favourite way to use up overripe bananas and waaaay more versatile than banana bread!

My homemade banana ‘ketchup’ served on a traditional Filipino longsilog plate. The pickle next to it is atchara. Quality gourmet longganisa from Tata Rods.
Sautéing the base aromatics: eschallots, garlic, ginger and tumeric.

I originally tried this recipe served with chicken adobo pies years ago to use leftover adobo. It pairs well with anything you’d use tomato sauce on, and is traditionally eaten with lumpia shanghai (Filipino spring rolls) or tortang talong (whole eggplant omelette). I like it as a snack to dip chicharon (fried pork rinds) in, as the tangy sweetness cuts through the richness.

Pat Nourse & Helen Goh in conversation via Instagram Live for #MFWFOnline

During Ottolenghi Chef Helen Goh’s Melbourne Food and Wine Festival 2020: Online edition chat with Pat Nourse she waxed lyrical about her newfound love of Filipino cuisine. All the Filipino viewers cheered together loudly from home! She noted tortang talong as one of her absolute favourites and slipped in mention of homemade banana catsup being at the top of her ‘to cook’ list. Pat Nourse actually ended up sharing this very recipe in his instagram stories! Next day he got a special delivery from chef John Rivera! See below for Pat’s post and a beautiful show of the Filipino community spirit in Australia.

More modern serving suggestion banana ‘ketchup’ and adobo pies
Put this sauce it anywhere you’d use tomato sauce…like a bacon and egg english muffin!

For best results, use almost-black bananas that you’d usually reserve for banana bread using less ripe ones will cause your sauce to jellify at room temperature. It will still be delicious, but not quite the right texture.


RECIPE

HOMEMADE BANANA CATSUP (BANANA ‘KETCHUP’)

  • 2 very ripe bananas (almost black), mashed till smooth (approx. 1 cup)
  • 2 medium eschallots, finely diced (or 1/2 a small brown onion)
  • 1-2 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 60ml cane/white vinegar
  • 60ml water
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon palm or brown sugar
  • 4 garlic cloves, finely grated (approx 1 tablespoon)
  • 3cm ginger, finely grated (approx 1 tablespoon)
  • 3cm turmeric, finely grated (approx 1 tablespoon fresh, 1 teaspoon if using ground turmeric)
  • ¼ teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1/2 tablespoon tomato paste
  • optional 1 birdseye chilli, finely sliced (1/4 tsp chilli flakes)

METHOD 

1. Heat oil in a medium non-stick pan on medium heat. Cook the eschallots until translucent. 

2. Add the ginger, garlic, turmeric and all spice to the pan. Cook till spices are fragrant. 

3. Add the tomato paste and cook for a minute, stirring well. Follow with vinegar, soy sauce, sugar, chilli and mashed banana. Simmer on low heat for 10-15 minutes, stirring often until it starts to thicken. 

4. Add 60ml of water or more as needed to reach desired consistency. It’s usually best between thick and runny, but it will thicken a bit as it cools. Taste and add extra seasoning to your liking. Take off the heat. Blend with a stick blender to get a smoother texture.

To store, allow sauce to cool and transfer to airtight sterilised jars or containers. Refrigerate for up to 2 weeks. It can be kept longer, but use your own judgement.

Serving suggestions:
Traditional Filipino dishes Tortang talong (eggplant omelette) lumpia shanghai (Filipino spring rolls) any breakfast silogs (rice+meat, I did longsilog further up).
More modern applications As I said…anywhere you’d use tomato sauce! I’ve enjoyed it with steak, roasted veg, on a bacon and egg roll, with marinated tofu and rice…it’s all good! 👌

SAHOG @ Home photo of me with my produce and Filipino Food Movement tee before the Instagram livestream!


This Filipino condiment was presented by me at SAHOG @ Home with Filipino Food Movement – an Instagram Live series by @filipinofoodmovementau featuring their most loved Australian Filipino chefs, cooks and food lovers. Don’t miss the next one! I also prepared burong mangga (pickled green mango) and atchara (pickled green papaya relish). I’ll post my other recipes here with more serving suggestions soon!

Cauliflower stem and leaf pizza with egg

Cauliflower leaves make an excellent pizza topping

Cauliflower leaves are quickly becoming my go-to zero-waste staple. This non-traditional pizza recipe came about when I ran out of baby spinach but was craving a spinach and egg pizza. The closest thing I had in the crisper was a whole cauliflower + extra cauliflower leaves (everyone left them behind at the grocers, so I sneakily grabbed a handful and put it with my cauliflower bag hehe). I thought…I COULD USE CAULIFLOWER LEAVES!

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I was going to use tomato paste on the base but decided to use kale stem pesto because I had some fresh. I usually make a big batch and keep some in the fridge, then freeze the rest in sheets so I can break off the amount I need. You can also just use readymade, but if you want to give it a go here’s my recipe for kale stem pesto.

Kale stem oesto spread on a pizza base

It’s pretty easy. Seperate the leaves and stems, cut the stems into small pieces and baked quickly to soften a bit, then pop it on a pizza base spread with kale stem pesto (my recipe here, you can also use store bought). Add a few other bits and pieces, pop it back in the oven, add your egg towards the end and there you have it! YOUR OWN. PERSONAL. PIZZA.

All the ingredients below can be subbed for whatever you have available…I just used what I had for this very last minute pizza. For the cheese go ahead an use something fancier like mozzarella or bocconcini (it’ll be better, obviously, but sometimes you just need to offload a few slices of cheese) or scale it back to the tasty cheese slices…nobody will know, not even Instagram. If you don’t have pistachios, almonds or hazelnuts would work just as well. The pizza base I tried happened to also contain cauliflower (Picasso kitchen cauliflower base – a regular base with cauliflower added to up the veg content). It wasn’t bad! I’d buy it again for quick meals like this. It was thin and became nice and crispy. I’d usually have less toppings but my slight distrust of the pizza base and hunger meant I piled it on a bit more.

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RECIPE

EASY CAULIFLOWER LEAF & EGG PIZZA

INGREDIENTS
Cauliflower leaves, 4 large pieces, stems attached
Pre-made pizza base
2 tbsp kale stem pesto (or pre-made pesto alternative)
10-12 kalamata olives, drained
1 tsp capers (optional – can just use a pinch of salt instead)
2 slices gouda cheese, torn into pieces (or whatever cheese you have)
100g pistachios, shelled and chopped
1 large egg
Salt and pepper, to taste

METHOD
1. Pre-heat a fan forced oven to 180°C. Rinse and trim the cauliflower leaves. Pat dry. Line a large oven tray with baking paper and set aside.

2. Pull leaves off cauliflower stems, keeping leaves and stems seperate. Tear the leaves into bite sized pieces. Chop stems into 1cm pieces, halving any large ones, then pop onto your lined baking tray with a drizzle of olive oil and 1 tsp of capers and pepper. Toss to coat in oil, place tray in oven for 2 minutes or till stems are beginning to soften slightly (this pre-cooking ensures they’re not undercooked at the end).

3. Spread pesto evenly onto your chosen pizza base using a spoon leaving a bit of a border for the crust edge. Scatter the cauliflower stems and capers, cauliflower leaves and pistachios on top making sure to leave an egg-sized bare circle on the middle of the base for the egg later on (one or two leaves on the circle are ok you just don’t want a mound of things there messing with the egg and popping the yolk). Top with cauliflower leaves and put back in the oven following the packet directions for the pizza base (my thin one required 8 minutes). Halfway through add your cheese on top (still avoiding the middle bare bit).

cheese

4. Meanwhile crack your egg into a ramekin so it’s easier to place it. Take out your pizza and drizzle with a little olive oil (the cauliflower leaves should be crispy, this addition of oil just ensures they don’t burn).
Carefully slide the egg out of the ramekin into the middle ensuring the yolk doesn’t break (no biggie if it does, it’ll just cook quicker). Use a spoon to spread out the egg white slightly to fill any gaps between it and the fillings. Place the olives anywhere the egg isn’t and put back into the oven for 2-3 minutes or until your pizza crust is golden and the egg is just starting to turn white on the edges (without clear bits).

rawegg

5. To serve sprinkle with some chopped pistachios, fresh basil leaves and pepper (there’s probably enough salt with the capers and olives). Season the egg with salt and pepper. Cut into 4 slices, ensuring all bits get a bit of egg/yolk and enjoy!

I’d love to hear your spin on this pizza! What did you add?

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MORE OF MY CAULIFLOWER LEAF RECIPES:
Easy Cauliflower Stem Breakfast Salad

WHAT ABOUT KALE STEMS, YOU SAY?
Save your stems! Easy raw kale pesto

Zero Waste veggie peel fritters

How often do you peel a carrot or a potato and chuck away the skin? Imagine if these nutritious strips could be turned into a whole ‘nother meal.

Well dream no more.

Recently I was cooking a bunch of carrots and parsnips, and didn’t have the heart to bin the peels — so I developed this frugal fritter recipe to make the most of them. It actually transforms them into caramelised discs of savoury goodness, with a subtle earthiness. You’ll never bin a peel again.

fritters1

RECIPE

ZERO WASTE VEGGIE PEEL FRITTERS

Serves 2 with leftovers. Cooking time: 30 mins

INGREDIENTS

  • 2.5 cups parsnip and carrot peels*, chopped finely (peels of approx 5 carrots and 4 small parsnips)**
  • Half a brown onion, finely diced
  • 1/4 cup self raising flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tsp ground tumeric
  • ½ tsp ground cumin
  • ½ tsp whole fennel Seeds
  • ¼ tsp ground nutmeg
  • Salt and pepper (to taste)
  • For serving: Greek yoghurt, salsa or chutney

METHOD

  1. In a biggish bowl mix together the eggs, onion, parsnip and carrot peels and any other veg. Add the flour, turmeric, cumin, nutmeg, salt and pepper and mix well.

  2. Heat a little vegetable oil in a non-stick fry pan on medium heat. Add heaped tablespoonfuls of the fritter mix in the pan pressing it flat into 1cm thick fritters before the mixture sets. Cook in batches for 2-3 mins per side or till golden.
  3. Transfer to a paper-towel-lined plate and keep warm. Serve fritters with salad and greek yoghurt, salsa or chutney.

fritters2fritters3fritters4fritters5

COOKING NOTES

* You can swap in and out any of the following veggie peels with this recipe: potato, sweet potato, beetroot and zucchini (if you weirdly were peeling zucchini for some reason, though it might make the mix watery so add flour to counteract).

** If you’re peeling veg but don’t feel like fritters, the peels will store well in a ziplock if used within a few days.

Cauliflower leaves become deliciously crispy when roasted

Whenever you have a cauliflower with the outer leaves and stalks in tact it’s almost second nature to pull them all off and bin them. I started this process recently and noticed there was almost as much leaf as actual cauliflower. That got me thinking…there had to be a way to utilise them…

cauliflower leaves

To clarify by ‘leaves’ I mean the green outer leaves and the stems they’re attached to. After a few experiments I whacked them in the oven with some seasoning I’d typically use on cauli. Once roasted, the leaves become incredibly crispy, in a kind of unexpected way. They taste like deep fried kale chips and nori (roasted seaweed, often used for sushi), while the stalks retained their cauliflower nuttiness.

I mixed the roasted cauliflower leaves into a little breakfast salad – but you could also enjoy them as a side, with other roasted veg or in a more substantial salad.

roasted cauliflower stems

RECIPE

EASY CAULIFLOWER STEM BREAKFAST SALAD 

Serves 1 as a light salad

INGREDIENTS
Cauliflower leaves (middle stalk intact)
Olive Oil
Cumin
Smoked paprika
Chilli flakes
Salt and pepper

TO SERVE
Fried egg
A few big handfuls of mixed salad leaves
Caramelised white balsamic

METHOD
1. Preheat oven to 200°C. Rinse the cauliflower leaves off and trim any woody ends off. Pat dry, then place on an oven tray. Drizzle with olive oil and toss well to coat.
2. Sprinkle cauliflower leaves with a bit of cumin, smoked paprika, chilli flakes, salt, pepper.
3. Pop into the hot oven for 10-15 minutes or until the leaves start to become golden and crispy. 10 minutes is enough for some light colour on them – while at 15 minutes they’ll look more like mine did with more char on the stalks and super crispy (almost deep fried looking) leaves.
4. To Serve: I tossed them with mixed salad leaves, a bit of caramelised balsamic and a fried egg on top.

roasted cauliflower leaf salad

roasted cauliflower stem salad with egg

BAM!

I definitely want to have another play around with these next time I get a leafy cauli and I can’t believe how many times I’ve just mindlessly thrown these delicious stalks away. Never again.

What do you use cauliflower leaves for?

 

Homegrown sweet potatoes are easier than you think

Recently I visited my dad and he gave me a gift: An old sweet potato from the very back of his fridge. It was sprouting and looked mostly unsalvageable.

“Ummm… thanks… dad…?”

He pushed it into my hands, “You should plant it.”

I assumed this was another one of his harebrained ideas, but I googled it and was surprised to find that it’s a thing. There’s a bit more of a process to it than just digging a hole and chucking in your sprouting sweet potato though…

1. Grow the slips

Slips are long, vine-like and leafing growths near the tip of a sweet potato – and it’s these that sprout baby sweet potatoes for you to enjoy (you can actually grow up to 50 slips per half). To grow slips, use a new sweet potato or one that’s already begun sprouting by itself. Cut it in half and place each cut side down in a bowl, glass or jar half submerged with water (pictured below). Leave it in a warm place and change the water daily to keep it fresh. I left mine for 2 weeks.

growing sweet potato sprouting slips

2. Let the roots grow

Once the slips have developed nice and long, it’s time to separate them from the mamma potato so they can grow on their own. Carefully twist the slips off where they connect to the sweet potato and place them in a shallow container with a little water to cover the bottom half of the stems.

slips-2

The roots will begin to grow and sprout leaves within a few days. When they’re 2-3 cm long they’re ready to be planted.

roots

3. Plant the slips

This step’s pretty straight forward. Dig 10cm deep holes and 7cm wide holes for each slip to be placed into. (P.S. I know this soil is suuuuper dry – but I’m going to try these tips here to rejuvenate it: https://soiltosupper.com/simple-ways-to-fix-dry-garden-soil/ ).

plant

4. Water!

watering2
plantsss

Soon I’ll never have to shop for sweet potatoes again – well at least that’s the plan. Stay tuned for updates on my sweet potato babies!